Tag Archives: Stephanie Thiers-Ratcliffe

“You should sleep naked, it’ll make you happy!” says bedsheet company

Sleeping naked could be the secret to a happy relationship, survey finds.

Sleeping naked and keeping food out of the bedroom are two of the secrets to a happy relationship, according to a survey.

A poll of 1,000 people across Britain showed that those who sleep together in the nude are most content in their marriage or relationship.

Less than half of people who wear pyjamas or nighties said they were “extremely happy”, compared to 57 per cent of those who went without.

Source: Independent, 30th June 2014

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Study reveals that couples who sleep naked have a happier relationship

Good news guys, a new survey has revealed that those who sleep naked have a happier relationship *burns all fleece pyjama sets*.

The study from Cotton USA asked couples what they slept in at bedtime and then asked them to rate how happy they were in their relationship.

Source: Metro, 30th June 2014

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In a blow for the PJ-wearers among us, it appears that the more you wear to bed, the more your relationship is doomed to failure. The word ‘appears’ being key, given the source of the survey:

The research, by Cotton USA, found that sleeping habits can have an impact on relationships as arguments break out or people avoid staying at their partner’s home overnight.

Cotton USA, the makers of cotton sheets, really do want you to believe that the feel of cotton against your skin at night is enough to keep your relationship from hitting the rocks.

Stephanie Thiers-Ratcliffe, from Cotton USA, said: “There are many factors which can affect the success of a relationship, but one factor which is often overlooked is the bedroom environment.“

There’s a good reason why the impact of nightwear is overlooked when assessing relationship success, Stephanie. See if you can guess it.

“Wear a nice pink cotton shirt, you’ll make more money!” says cotton spokesperson

According to the Daily Mail:

The power of pink: Men who wear shirts of that colour earn £1,000 a year more than those who don’t

– Men who wear pink also tend to be confident and get more compliments from female colleagues

– Research also found men in white are most punctual, while those in blue have the least work romances

Men who wear pink shirts to work earn more and are better qualified than those who favour traditional colours such as white or blue, it has emerged.

Researchers also found men who wear pink are more likely to get compliments from female colleagues and are more confident characters in the office.

The story was also picked up by The Independent and The Telegraph. Who were the researchers undertaking this valuable research?
 
Stephanie Thiers-Ratcliffe, International Marketing Manager for Cotton USA, which commissioned the study, said: ‘You can tell a lot about someone by the colour they wear.
It isn’t hard to see why a cotton spokesperson might have an interest in reminding us of the value of a nice cotton shirt.
 
Unsurprisingly, the research was carried out by OnePoll – the polling company behind almost every dodgy survey story you’ll see, and a company who have such more work published in the Daily Mail they’re practically on retainer. Here’s the press release on their parent company’s website:
 
Plugging the press release into Churnalism.com, it’s clear that the Daily Mail’s David Baker had a laid-back morning on the 22nd, taking a whopping 84% of his article directly from the press release. Not too far behind him was Mark Reynolds of the Daily Express, who took 67% of his article from the press release.
 
As for the so-called research, the findings have a near-astrological feel: 
 
One in four men feels more attractive in a pink shirt and those who frequently wear purple or lilac have the most office romances, while those who prefer blue have the least.
 
Men who wear pink are also twice as likely to have a Master’s degree than those who favour white shirts, with one in ten pink shirt wearers having a PHD.
The report also found men who favour shirts with green tones are the most likely to be late for work, whilst white shirt fans are the most punctual, the survey found.
And if you are trying for a promotion then it’s best to dress in a purple shirt, it emerged.
So it may well be that the colour of your shirt dictates certain attributes about your life… or it may well be that if you ask enough questions, you’ll gather enough data to be able to mine your way to a raft of meaningless conclusions.
 
Also, can you spot the glaring flaw? I’ll give you a hint: since when did anyone ever wear the same shirt colour every day…?