Tag Archives: metro

“Everyone’s getting a beard transplant!” says surgeon willing to do ridiculous procedure

Wannabe hipsters can get a beard transplant for £7,000

A check shirt, waistcoat and fixed-gear bike used to be enough to set the aspiring hipster on his way. For the whiskerless wannabe, it seems that something more drastic is now required: a beard transplant.

Rising numbers of men are having facial follicle grafts to achieve the bushy look favoured by trendy urbanites, surgeons say. The cultural link between beards and masculinity is also fuelling demand in some ethnic groups.

Source: The Times, 3rd October 2015

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Men are spending thousands on beard transplants

Men said they had spent up to £14,500 on beard transplants.

Men are spending thousands of pounds to fill in their patchy beards, as the number of beard transplant procedures increases dramatically.

Men surveyed by The New York Times said they spent up to £14,500 on beard transplants to achieve a fully groomed look.

Source: Independent, 2nd October 2015

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Beard transplants really are all the rage, aren’t they? In fact, is there anyone among us who haven’t had one? I’ve personally had three, because this is definitely a thing and definitely a big trend and definitely not just a PR piece for a private hair clinic to try to pretend that the niche service they offer is secretly the Next Big Thing:

The number of beard transplants performed has risen from being just 1.5 per cent of all hair restoration procedures undertaken internationally in 2012 to 3.7 per cent in 2014, according to the nonprofit medical association, International Society of Hair Restoration.

Vincenzo Gambino, president of the ISHRS said: “While a clean-shaven appearance is still popular, beards are now very trendy among more males than ever before thanks to their resurgence in Hollywood and among professional athletes.”

“For those who prefer a fuller beard or more facial hair, beard hair transplants offer excellent results.”

Well, thank god the ISHRS is here to offer us expensive and clearly-niche surgery to live up to the latest look, while using their PR to make out like this is an entirely normal state of affairs. Otherwise this whole story could have seemed utterly ridiculous.

“Your boobs change size, so you should buy a new bra!” says bra company

Our cups runneth over! Average bra size rises from 36C to 36DD… with women from Cheshire and Manchester boasting the largest assets

Britain’s average bra size has risen from a 36C to a more voluptuous 36DD, with women in the North West of England boasting the biggest bust.

The Great British Bra Survey, which polled 2,000 women aged between 16 and 75, suggested that size differed depending on where where you lived and even which month your birthday was.

Women in Cheshire, Manchester and Lancashire have the largest assets, an average DD, while ladies from the North East, including Durham and Newcastle, average a B cup.

Source: Daily Mail, 14th September 2015

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As any good PR professional will tell you, people love boobs, and newspapers love stories about boobs… which is why it was no surprise to see this results of the ‘Great British Bra Survey’ splash across the pages of the Daily Mail, the Mirror, the Metro, Cosmopolitan, Warrington Guardian, Derby Telegraph, Liverpool Echo, Manchester Confidential and This is Lancashire – each adorned with pictures of boobs (or pictures of bras, for those not wanting to be too obvious).

According to the ‘research’, breast size is on the rise, with the average cup moving from a 36C to a 36DD. Elsewhere in the story, the data is mined to within an inch of its life: firstly for the geographical breakdown (which results in the extensive local news coverage where breasts are said to be largest, naturally), and then, inexplicably, by month of birth. Primarily, one assumes, to pad out the story. Yes, that was intentional.

Which august research body is behind these findings?

Nicola Rodney-Crook, managing director of Bras and Honey, which sponsored the research, said:

‘An average woman will change bra size six times in her life so while it’s important to ensure that we review the bra market on a regular basis, we also have a responsibility to help educate women at the same time.

‘For example, not many women know that their bra size will fluctuate throughout the month, let alone throughout the year.’

The angle is clear: a lingerie firm wants to encourage women to buy more bras, so they commission a headline-baiting survey to remind women that their breast size may fluctuate, and so it’s time to replenish the lingerie drawer.

“Your partner is probably lying about an STI!” says online pharmacy

Would YOU admit to having an STI? A third of Brits wouldn’t… or use a condom

OVER three quarters of Brits have admitted they wouldn’t confess to having a sexual transmitted disease, a new survey has revealed.

Seventy six per cent of 18-45-year-olds surveyed in by research company MedExpress revealed they wouldn’t confess to having an STI.

The research – which involved talking to 2,521 British adults – is shocking, to say the least.

Source: Express, 7th October 2015

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Would YOU tell your partner if you had an STD? 67% of people would lie about it, and 8% would go on to have unprotected sex

Whether it’s a case of chlamydia or an instance of genital warts, most people would keep their STI a secret, a new survey reveals.

The majority of people (67 per cent) would lie to their partner about having an STI, the poll found.

When asked why, 92 per cent said they wouldn’t want to put the other person off sleeping with them.

Shockingly, 10 per cent said they would use a condom for penetrative sex but not for oral sex even if they had an STI.

And eight per cent admitted they would still have sex without a condom.

Source: Daily Mail, 8th October 2015

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We are, alas, a nation of lying philanderers, putting our sexual health and that of our partner at risk because of our insatiable lust for sex with strangers. Or so says this survey, commissioned to promote an online pharmacy:

Michael Ross, spokesperson for online pharmacy Medexpress.co.uk, which carried out the survey said: ‘It is also shocking to see how many people would actually lie if they had an STI.

‘Sexually transmitted infections should be taken seriously and willingly lying and then sleeping with someone, especially if you aren’t willing to wear protection, is outright nasty.

‘We urge people to be honest with anyone they plan to be sleeping with; this will help prevent the unnecessary spreading of sexually transmitted diseases.’

While the tone of the message from the Medexpress spokesperson is admirable*, it’s fair to say the stats behind the story become somewhat more questionable when viewed in the light of a PR survey aimed squarely at getting a company name into the newspapers. In fact, here’s the view on the coverage from the PR company involved, 10 Yetis:

MedExpress, our online doctor and pharmacy client, recently undertook a study looking into the sexual behaviours and attitudes of Britons between 18 and 45 years old.

The results of the study brought to lie some absolute shockers (or not, if you’re more the wild kind), such as;

– 76% wouldn’t admit to having an STI
– A further 8% wouldn’t use extra protection if they found out they had an STI
– 32% lie about the number of people they’ve slept with

There were far more shockers in the release that went out, including how many people it’s acceptable to admit to sleeping with to a potential partner (seriously, go check it out)…

In the meantime though, we wanted to show off some of the great coverage we’ve had through off the back of pushing this release out…

Good to see a PR company happy to throw people with STIs under the bus in order to promote their client. And people wonder why I call for more ethical PR practices.

*UPDATE: I spoke to Dr Petra Boynton, a social psychologist specialising in sex and relationships research. She explained to me the potential harm of PR stories like this:

I don’t think calling people ‘nasty’ for not disclosing if they have an STI is okay. Many people don’t know they have infections, or may not realise until after they’ve had sex with others. It’s very rare people really do know and deliberately infect other people (and that’s a whole, complex situation in itself). This kind of shaming is what puts people off going to clinics for help as they fear that’s how healthcare staff will relate to them.

The overall tone also is hugely stigmatising around STIs and maintains the whole idea they’re shameful and embarrassing – so much so that people lie about it and what bastards they are for doing so.

“Your partner is hiding their debts from you!” says credit rating company

Do YOU know much your spouse earns? Half of married couples don’t know – and less than two-thirds discuss finances

Married couples may have agreed to share their lives – but it seems they are a bit more reluctant to share their bank statements.

A survey has found that almost half of married people do not know what their spouse earns.

And a secretive further third only divulge details of their finances to their partner on a ‘need to know’ basis.

Source: Daily Mail, 3rd September 2015

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Debt news now, and the ‘finding’ that we have no clue about our partners’ finances is a story that got plenty of play – not just in the Daily Mail, but also in the Metro and in two separate stories in the Telegraph: “How well do you really know your partner?” (3rd September 2015) and “How long should you wait before asking a date’s salary?” (3rd September 2015).

Clearly it’s a story that tapped into a nerve – which will no doubt please the company with the vested interest in making you suspicious about what debts your partner might have, who just happened to create this finding:

The study, by credit rating agency Noddle, also asked about finances at the beginning of a relationship, finding that more than a quarter of single men and women said that they would break up with a new partner if they found out they were in a lot of debt.

Noddle are the kind of company that can tell you if your partner has any debts, so it’s hardly going against their commercial interests to plant into the minds of readers that debt would be a good reason to end a relationship – despite, it’s worth pointing out, the overwhelming majority of people (75%) disagreeing with that particular hook line. As ever, with Bad PR surveys, the numbers do not matter, they’re simply the delivery mechanism for the message. As is the obligatory spokesperson quote:

Jacqueline Dewey, of Noddle, said: ‘Our research shows that as a nation we still shy away from talking about money, even with our spouse or partner.

‘Whilst it may seem tempting to keep this information to yourself, it can have a detrimental impact on your financial decisions and, ultimately, your relationship.

‘Knowing about your financial health – and that of anyone you are financially involved with – is crucial whether you’re applying for a credit card, getting a mortgage or looking for the best deals on utilities or mobile phones.

‘That’s why we’re calling for consumers to have full financial disclosure with their other halves.’

Yes, Jacqueline, you want people to understand their finances for the good of their relationship – not, say, because it will result in more business for Noddle.

“Come to our town, impregnate an attractive French girl!” says holiday board via viral marketer

Did you hear the story of the pregnant woman who fell pregnant after a one-night stand, and appealed on Youtube to track down the father? It was all over the news at the start of September:

‘I just want to see him again… if he says no then OK’; Young French tourist who posted a video looking for the Australian man she says she fell pregnant to in a one-night stand tearfully defends herself against online skeptics

The young French woman, who appealed for help online to find the man she says got her pregnant on the last night of a three month trip to Australia, has defended herself against online skeptics.

Natalie Amyot, from Paris, has returned to the Mooloolaba on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast where she said she spent ‘a beautiful night’ with a ‘really cute’ man she fell instantly in love with.

Source: Daily Mail, 1st September 2015

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Are YOU her one-night stand? French beauty seeks Australian boy to tell him she’s PREGNANT

A STUNNING young french girl has started a viral search for a man whom she spent the night with in Australia – to tell him she’s pregnant.

Natalie Amyot, from Paris, is fast becoming a viral sensation after posting a video on Facebook about her search for a handsome young man with whom she spent the night earlier this year.

Natalie’s last night of a three month trip to Australia was spent frolicking with this mystery man, and then the pair went home together.

Source: Express, 2nd September 2015

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Just who was this girl who had an ‘amazing’ time in an ‘amazing’ place, looking for the guy she lost? Funny story…

‘Natalie Amyot’: Video of French woman appealing to find holiday romance in Australia revealed as hoax

A French woman who released a YouTube video to apparently find her Australian holiday romance after falling pregnant has confirmed it was a hoax.

The video of “Natalie Amyot” making a plea to viewers to help her find the man was met with a combination of support, derision and a hefty dose of scepticism

Source: Independent, 2nd September 2015

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As the Independent, Daily Mail, Mirror and Metro eventually concluded, rather than a true modern tale of a lady seeking out the prince charming who impregnated her on her final night of a fantastic holiday, the story is actually nothing more than a PR stunt designed to advertise holidays in the Mooloolaba area. As the culprit behind the video revealed the next day:

‘This has been a viral video for Holiday Mooloolaba. My name is Andy Sellar and I own a company called Sunny Coast social media,’ he said.

‘We do viral videos for businesses. Now I know there is going to be a lot of you that are upset by this… maybe not too happy.

‘We just wanted to put Mooloolaba on the map because it’s a wonderful place. So thank you for watching and we are going to do many, many more videos like this,’ he explained.

There’s a deeply interesting element to this story for those who follow PR, journalism and viral marketing. First, it exposes the credibility of the major news sources in the digital age, where neatly packaged stories routinely land on journalists’ laps and are passed uncritically into the news, especially where a quirky-and-slightly-sexy angle and a highly photogenic young lady are concerned. It was a perfect story for so many outlets, and as such was too good to really fact check – after all, why put in the legwork that will discover that the story is bogus, and therefore have to kill a perfectly serviceable piece of clickbait?

Secondly, of particular note is the extent of the second wave of coverage, based on the big reveal: highlighting that the story was a hoax had an even greater impact in the press, as newspapers who failed to publish the original got to gloat over their taken-in rivals, and those who did publish it get to add a coda to an quirky story and get to run the same photogenic young lady again. Newspapers like the Mail, who ran the first story with notes about skeptics who doubted the veracity – yet the paper still ran the story – added notes into the follow up to suggest they’d been the ones to break the big reveal:

A former friend of the fictional Ms Amyot confirmed to Daily Mail Australia she was in fact Alizee Michel who is believed to have studied marketing and tourism.

Jordan Foster said Ms Michel had attended the University of the Sunshine Coast – north of Brisbane – for ‘a few years’.

Which would have been a great angle, had the story not also included the video produced by Andy Sellars coming clean – something the Mail certainly did not dig up.

Finally, there’s the note from Andy about his future plans:

So thank you for watching and we are going to do many, many more videos like this,’ he explained.

Given that we can show that fooling the papers is easy when they are very willing to be fooled, and that revealing your hoax gains you a second and even greater wave of publicity, I can certainly see why Andy might be looking to score the next viral hit.

It would be easy to mistake the analysis by this blog as humourless, po-faced parade-pissing around issues that are often just a harmless bit of fun, and to an extent there are elements of the criticism that ring true. However, it’s undeniable that the newspapers are not so hard to fool, and that’s an incentive to other PR agencies to produce more falsehood-laden PR fodder, to create more spurious studies and nonsensical formulae, and to continue using the mainstream news as their own private advertising channel, at the extent of the newspaper’s reputation and the trust of its readership. It’s hard to celebrate that as a particularly good thing.

“People don’t think enough about growing old!” says life insurance provider

Young do not feel grown up until 29, survey shows

Living at home longer, playing computer games and watching children’s films among most common reasons for young people not feeling like adults

Britons do not believe they have become a “grown-up” until they reach the age of 29, it has been revealed.

Despite becoming an adult at the age of 18, the average young person believes it is another 11 years until they are actually an adult.

Source: Telegraph, 3rd September 2015

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The average Brit doesn’t feel like a grown-up until they’re 29, study finds

Ever still feel like you’re an 8-year-old with each passing birthday? Well new research has revealed that despite technically becoming an adult at 18, the average Brit does not feel like they have become a ‘grown-up’ until they reach the age of 29.

The study cites ‘living at home longer, playing computer games, watching children’s movies and a reluctance to settle for a “real job”’ as some of the most common reasons for not feeling like an adult, though speculatively I would add to that increasing life spans and the general death of adulthood in culture.

Source: Independent, 2nd September 2015

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Apparently we don’t feel like proper adults until the age of 29

You might be allowed to drink, drive, vote and all that jazz at 18, but a new study says Brits don’t really feel like proper grown-ups until we hit 29.

The research carried out by Beagle Street life insurance shows that we’re all basically big kids at heart, still watching cartoons and children’s films.

Well, let’s be honest, Frozen is amazing.

Other factors that are preventing us from letting go of our adolescence include refusing to settle for ‘a real job’, whatever that is, and living at home longer.

Source: Metro, 3rd September 2015

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Today’s generation is late to grow up, reluctant to look ahead to the future, incapable of planning – according to a survey by a life insurance company:

Matthew Gledhill, managing director of Beagle Street, said: “The research shows that growing up is less about years and more about reaching milestones in life like getting married, becoming a parent or buying a home.

“With each of these life events there is a need to take responsibility and a need to become an adult as you have people depending on you to do so.”

He added: “Whether it’s before or after the age of 29, when people do get on the property ladder or start a family it is important that they are protected and we have used technology to remove unnecessary complication and unnecessary cost so it is really easy to get great value life insurance to do just that.”

So while the article looks like a report on what age we truly grow up, it’s actually an attempt to highlight to people that they should take more responsibility – by which we mean buy whatever Beagle Street insurance is selling.

“Aren’t burgers scientifically great?” says supermarket chain’s burger promotion

 

The news was ablaze last week with talk of the scientifically-perfect burger, although what else can you expect on ‘National Burger Day’?

How to make the perfect burger: Oxford food scientist claims to have answer

Oxford University chef says perfect burger is 7cm tall, should be eaten to music, given a name and should feel as good as it tastes.

A leading food scientist claims to have created the perfect burger – and says that its smell and feel are more important than the taste.

The best burgers are 7cm tall, 5cm wide and boast nine layers, according to Oxford University chef and food perception expert Charles Michel.

Source: Telegraph, 26th August 2015

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A 7cm wide patty, crunchy lettuce and a warm bun… eaten with your hands: Chef reveals formula for the perfect burger (and how it SOUNDS is as important as the taste)

Making a delicious burger may seem as simple as whacking a beef patty between two sesame seed buns and finishing adding a slice of iceberg lettuce – but scientists are now begging to disagree.

According to new research commissioned by Asda, a great hamburger should stimulate all the senses including sound and feel.

Chef and flavour researcher, Charles Michel, said that the sensation of the burger in our hands and the crunch of the lettuce all add to the overall experience.

Source: Daily Mail, 26th August 2015

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National Burger Day 2015: What does your perfect burger look like?

In a now annual tradition, today we gather together, slap meat into a sliced piece of bread, and stick it in our mouths. Here are the burgers we dreamt of waking up to, on National Burger Day morning — and our pick of our favourite real ones.

Source: Independent, 27th August 2015

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This is how to make the ‘perfect’ burger for National Burger Day

It’s National Burger Day tomorrow and we’re already salivating in anticipation of perhaps the greatest food day of the year.

But where to go for the perfect burger?

According to chef Charles Michel, your best bet is to stay at home – and cook up his ‘perfect’ burger.

Michel is the chef in residence at Oxford University’s Crossmodal Research Laboratory, where they analyse how our senses work.

He has conducted some Very Important research in labs for Asda to prove scientifically what makes the perfect burger, from the individual ingredients to the entire eating experience.

Source: Metro, 26th August 2015

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Who’d have thought there was a scientist out there independently undertaking such important research as figuring out what the perfect burger consists of? And at Oxford University, no less! What a time to be alive… except, of course, that this was not legitimate research, and was by no means independently-derived:

Mr Michel’s work was commissioned by supermarket Asda to celebrate National Burger Day on Thursday.

No, indeed, this was merely a case of Charles Michel being employed to lend his name to a promotion by a supermarket chain. We can even see the full press release on the Asda website, including the infographic featured in the Telegraph and Daily Mail.

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In case you’re wondering what Asda’s angle is in this, the obligatory spokesperson quote makes everything clear:

Asda’s beef buyer Neil Moorcroft said: “Burgers have come a long way from a humble beef patty in a bun to a great British favourite and gastronomic dish.

“Wagyu burgers are full of flavour, texture and have a decent amount of fat to carry burger smells to our nostrils. It’s important to us to support food innovation and offer customers something new.

“We want people to listen to the sounds and appreciate all of their senses when biting into their perfect burgers this National Burger Day.”

As for the scientist, I’m not sure Oxford University would relish their name being bandied around quite so cheaply. Yes, relish.

“Kids have unrealistic salary expectations!” says group of bankers

Another from the ‘kids are stupid’ file now, with the finding that pupils who have just gotten their GCSE’s aren’t fully acquainted with the realities of payscales:

GCSE results 2015: Average school-leaver expects to earn almost £90,000, Santander survey reveals

Bank says only 7% would consider becoming an apprentice which shows ‘there is still a lack of awareness’

The average school-leaver expects to earn an annual salary of almost £90,000 at the height of their career – despite the UK average being £26,500, according to new Santander research.

The bank, which is one of the UK’s biggest personal financial service providers, spoke with almost 500 Year 11 students to gain an insight into their career attitudes to discover they think they’ll be taking home £89,000.

Source: Independent, 21st August 2015

GCSE results day: School leavers reckon they’re going to be on £90k a year

If you know anyone getting their GCSE results today you may want to sit them down and have a word.

The average 16-year-old reckons they will be on £89,000 a year at the peak of their career with one in five expecting to hit £100,000.

The average salary, remind them, is currently £26,500 and while some of them undoubtedly will make a decent amount of money, their expectations are pretty unrealistic.

The findings are from a Santander survey aimed at gauging young people’s career attitudes and expectations, released the day students discover their GCSE results.

Source: Metro, 20th August 2015

First off, it’s worth highlighting that the story in both papers is merely a trimmed down version of a press release by Santander – meaning no original journalism, or likely even fact-checking, was done by either the Metro or the Independent in this case:

This is particularly telling, as the press release wasn’t overly interested in kids’ earnings over their career as it was advertising Santander’s apprenticeships, as we can see from the quote in the Independent coverage:

The results also showed how apprenticeships are being perceived among the group: only seven per cent would consider becoming an apprentice which, Santander said, shows there is still a lack of awareness amongst young people of the career benefits and opportunities available through becoming one.

HR director at Santander, Vicky Wallis, described how there is the perception amongst young people that apprenticeships are only for ‘hands on’, manual professions.

While young people have a good understanding of the value of college and university, she said, there is a significant number who are unaware of the benefits of apprenticeships.

She added: “We need to encourage young people to look into the vast number of opportunities available to them through apprenticeships and the multitude of sectors involved, such as banking.”

As for the kids and their sky-high salary expectations, while what they want to earn might not be too closely aligned to reality, to have this pointed out by workers in the banking industry is something of a pot and kettle scenario.

“Kids need to know more about natural foods!” says natural food company

We’ve seen before, the ignorance of children is always a reliable hook for a Bad PR story, and last week was no difference, with one particular tale getting coverage in the Metro, the Express and twice in the Mirror:

Shocking figures reveal one in ten children don’t know APPLES grow on trees

WOULD you believe one in ten children don’t know apples grow on trees? It’s a scary reality.

New research released today has revealed far too many children aren’t aware of the origin of fruit and vegetables grown in England.

Source: Express, 19th August 2015

Fears for children’s food knowledge with one in 10 thinking bananas are made in factories

Kids also told the survey honey came from cows and chocolate bars grew on trees – and worryingly, some of the grown-ups were just as bad

Almost half of children who took part in a food poll failed to identify how 10 types of fruit were grown, with some believing bananas were made in factories.

One in 10 of the youngsters, who were aged six to 10, had no idea that apples grow on trees.

Source: Mirror, 19th August 2015

As with many Bad PR stories, these findings would be shocking if true – but as ever, that’s quite a significant ‘if’. Can it really be true that 10% of kids genuinely don’t know that apples come from trees? Can it be the case that ‘some’ kids really do think that strawberries “just popped up in the fridge”, as the Mirror’s version of the story points out? Call me highly skeptical, not least given the source of the claims:

Research conducted this week by The Fabulous Bakers, UK’s only mainstream bakery using all natural ingredients, showed some surprising results…

The Fabulous Bakers conducted its research to mark the launch of its new online film, which aims to educate and entertain children about just how fascinating and fabulous the natural world and its natural ingredients are.

Somewhat convenient, then, that ‘research’ commissioned by a company which markets itself on natural ingredients ‘proves’ that kids know nothing about natural ingredients. Of course, given that the ‘research’ consisted of an online opinion poll, it’s not hard to start to postulate as to how it might not be fully rigorous. How do you ensure the kids are answering about what they really think, rather than what they think would be fun to say? Do the kids even care about their answers? Probably not.

More importantly, can you be absolutely sure the questions were answered only by children? Here, for me, is the crux of it: parents have to sign their kids up for online surveys, and are paid a very tiny amount for each one that’s completed. If your kid isn’t there, you either ignore the survey and miss out on the micropayment… or you pretend your kid is there and bank the cash, clicking your way through the multiple-choice questions at will. Suddenly that ‘some’ people say strawberries simply appear in the fridge doesn’t seem quite so hard to explain now…

Still, at least the Fabulous Bakers got their time in the sun – or, at least, twice in the Mirror:

Victoria Willis of The Fabulous Bakers said: “It is really important that people know exactly where the food we put into our bodies comes from.

“When you look closely at how natural ingredients grow, you really do appreciate just how fabulous the natural world is.”

And it’s only when you look closely at how unnatural PR stories come about, you really do appreciate how fabulously shitty the effect of commercial PR on journalism is.

“You should sleep naked, it’ll make you happy!” says bedsheet company

Sleeping naked could be the secret to a happy relationship, survey finds.

Sleeping naked and keeping food out of the bedroom are two of the secrets to a happy relationship, according to a survey.

A poll of 1,000 people across Britain showed that those who sleep together in the nude are most content in their marriage or relationship.

Less than half of people who wear pyjamas or nighties said they were “extremely happy”, compared to 57 per cent of those who went without.

Source: Independent, 30th June 2014

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Study reveals that couples who sleep naked have a happier relationship

Good news guys, a new survey has revealed that those who sleep naked have a happier relationship *burns all fleece pyjama sets*.

The study from Cotton USA asked couples what they slept in at bedtime and then asked them to rate how happy they were in their relationship.

Source: Metro, 30th June 2014

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In a blow for the PJ-wearers among us, it appears that the more you wear to bed, the more your relationship is doomed to failure. The word ‘appears’ being key, given the source of the survey:

The research, by Cotton USA, found that sleeping habits can have an impact on relationships as arguments break out or people avoid staying at their partner’s home overnight.

Cotton USA, the makers of cotton sheets, really do want you to believe that the feel of cotton against your skin at night is enough to keep your relationship from hitting the rocks.

Stephanie Thiers-Ratcliffe, from Cotton USA, said: “There are many factors which can affect the success of a relationship, but one factor which is often overlooked is the bedroom environment.“

There’s a good reason why the impact of nightwear is overlooked when assessing relationship success, Stephanie. See if you can guess it.