Tag Archives: Alice Hughes

“It’s annoying to be ripped-off!” says mobile phone switching service, via OnePoll

Rip-off news now, with the revelation that we dislike paying too much for things:

Popcorn cinema and hospital parking top list of British rip-offs

Do you ever find yourself getting wound up at the price of healthy food, or the cost of anything at the airport?

Well you might be in good company, as a new study has revealed the top British rip-offs in modern life. Over 2000 adults were asked what they resent paying for, from eating, communicating and travelling.

The results show that more than half believed they get overcharged for things on a daily basis, with nearly 25 per cent even considering a move to another country to get away from ‘rip off Britain’.

Source: Metro, 27th June 2019

Brits’ biggest rip offs revealed from TV licences to cinema food and parking

Hospital car parking, food at the cinema and two-year phone contracts are among life’s biggest rip-offs, according to a study.

The study of 2,000 adults found eight in 10 believe there are ‘too many rip-offs in modern life’ in every area from eating, communicating and travelling.

Further overpriced products were found to be TV licenses, ‘anything’ at the airport and estate agent fees.

Source: Mirror, 27th June 2019

RIP-OFF BRITAIN: Hospital car parks, cinema snacks and mobile contracts found to be life’s ‘biggest rip-offs’

HOSPITAL car parking, food at the cinema and two-year phone contracts are among life’s biggest rip-offs.

A study of 2,000 adults found eight in ten believe there are “too many rip-offs in modern life” in every area from eating, communicating and travelling.

Source: The Sun, 27th June 2019

Who wants you to consider how miffed you get about paying more than you ought to for something?

The research was commissioned by SMARTY, tying in with the introduction of Auto-Switch on July 1st.

Under new regulations, all mobile providers will introduce Auto-Switch as a simplified way for consumers to switch between providers, this will ensure customers only have to contact their current provider once in order to move away from them.

SMARTY’s spokeswoman Jasmine Birtles said: “The results prove just how common rip-offs and hidden charges are and how frustrated Brits are at getting caught out by them.

Hat’s off to Bad PR regulars 72 Point, whose total infiltration of the Mirror’s online platform has once again paid dividends, with their full press release being printed without a jot of editing or fact checking, and by-lined to a 72 Point employee to boot.

“People love classic old pop hits!” says classic pop radio station

Pop news now, with the news that the definitive, official best year in music has been objectively decreed:

Brits reveal their favourite year for music – and the greatest decade

It’s official – 1984 was the best year for music according to Brits.

The year of Prince’s Purple Rain album, The Red Hot Chilli Pepper’s debut and the notable Band Aid record ‘Do They Know It’s Christmas’ beat all other years from the 70s through to the 90s.

It was also the year George Michael achieved five top 10 singles and Frankie Goes to Hollywood spent five weeks at number one with “Relax”.
Second place went to 1985 with 45 per cent also choosing the colourful eighties as the top decade overall for music.

Source: Mirror, 11th June 2019

It was news that was, unsurprisingly, something of a gift to radio stations, whose running orders for the day could revolve around playing the top hits of 1984, and asking callers which year they felt was the greatest year for pop music.

That the story was so convenient for radio stations is no surprise, given the company who paid for the story to be put together:

The study was commissioned by Greatest Hits Radio.

Presenter Mark Goodier said: “The results prove how defining the 80s were as a decade for music, artists such as Queen, Wham! and Madonna were at their peak and of course the Band Aid release bought together some of the biggest acts.

As for the story itself, the Mirror attributed it to Alice Hughes, a Creative Account Manager for PR company 72 Point, whose marketing copy the Mirror reproduced entirely.

“Music can be quite calming” says herbal calming remedy with no evidence of effectiveness

How do you like to wind down when you’re stressed? One particular product wants you to think about how you like to relax.

Songs which help Brits ‘keep calm and carry on’ revealed

Louis Armstrong’s ‘It’s A Wonderful World’ is the song busy Brits are most likely to play to help them make it through the day, a study has found.

The soulful 1967 ballad beat The Beatles classic ‘Let it Be’ and Elton John’s ‘Your Song’.

Other popular go-to artists for taking time out include Aretha Franklin, Adele and Ed Sheeran.

A study of 2,000 adults found pop and classical are the favoured choice to help us relax.

Almost half admitted music helps them cope with their hectic lifestyle.

Source: Mirror, 29th May 2019

Which company might have a vested interest in positioning themselves as a brand that cares about your relaxation needs?

The research was commissioned by Rescue Remedy to encourage Brits to tune into inner positive playlists during overwhelming times.

Rescue Remedy’s brand manager, Sandra Niland, said: “It’s clear from the research that our moods and music are closely linked.

“Today’s hectic and ‘always on’ lifestyle can quickly get on top of us and everyday things from the commute to managing a balance of work, family and social life can seem overwhelming.

“We’re encouraging Brits to tune into their inner positive playlist and relate music to feelings of calm and relaxation.”

Rescue Remedy, for the uninitiated, is a brand of Bach Flower remedies – a form of alternative medicine in which ludicrously small amounts of flower extract is diluted into large amounts of water or brandy, and then sold as a cure for what ails you.

It’s also worth pointing out that the marketing and PR budget for companies like Rescue Remedy invariably dwarf the money those companies spend on research and development. Whether their product works or not seems to matter much less to the company than whether they can persuade people to spend their money on it.