“People make lots of small cash payments!” says touchless payment card

Workers spend more than £2,500 a year on lunch and snacks, report says

The amount that people who travel to work spend on small purchases such as coffee, breakfast, lunch and snacks adds up to an average of £10.59 a day

Workers fork out more than £2,500 a year typically for small purchases such as coffees, breakfast, lunch and snacks, according to a report.

Source: Telegraph, 23rd June 2014

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£2,500 a year on work snacks: Average commuter spends more than £10 a day on lunch, takeaway coffees and other food

Workers spend more than £2,500 a year typically for small purchases such as coffees, breakfast, lunch and snacks, research has found.

On average, the amount commuters spend on these small and regular purchases adds up to £10.59 a day.

Over the course of a year, taking weekends and holidays out of the equation, the total comes to £2,541, according to the study by Visa.

Source: Daily Mail, 23rd June 2014

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It’s little surprise to see people spending money on their lunch each day, although the amount does seem a little high for work snacks. How precisely does that figure break down?

The survey of more than 2,100 British commuters found they typically spend £3.69 buying lunch, £2.09 on hot drinks and £7.09 if they pop to the supermarket during a break to stock up on food and drink for the evening.

Remarkably, the “£2500 per year on work snacks” includes buying food and drink in the supermarket for when you get home after work. In fact, percentage-wise, the majority of that £2500 of snacks for the working day is food not actually intended for the working day at all – it’s right there in the article!

Also right there in the article is the identity of the company who paid for this ‘research’ to make the papers:

The research for Visa Contactless found that on average, the amount that people who travel to work spend on these small and regular purchases adds up to £10.59 a day.

Visa, of course, have a clear incentive to make us aware of how often we make small payments like this:

The rise in contactless technology, which allows people to make small payments by swiping a reader with their card, means more than 300,000 terminals across the UK now accept such payments.