“Loads of girls keep diaries nowadays!” says TV channel promoting show about diaries

The youth of today may not be as internet-obsessed as you might expect, and are surprisingly fond of the pen and paper, according to The Mirror recently:

Young girls use a diary not Facebook to log their most intimate thoughts

More 16-19-year-olds are turning to the private world of pen and paper to jot down what they really think

Teenage girls may use social network Facebook for cosy chats with friends but they keep their most intimate thoughts in an old fashioned diary, a survey has revealed.

In the age of social network sites which are awash with gossip, banter and everyday problems, more 16-19-year-olds are turning to the private world of pen and paper to jot down what they really think.

Research by broadcaster E4 found 83% of today’s teenage girls keep a diary compared with 69% in the 1990s when the internet was a sci-fi dream.

Source: Mirror, 14 January 2013

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This would tell us something interesting and revealing about the appeal of a good, old-fashioned paper diary… were it not a press release for a new E4 TV show about diaries in a pre-internet age:

Dear Facebook, to know the REAL truth, read my diary

Research by E4 reveals personal pen-and-paper diaries more popular than ever as teens take comfort in private journals over social networking sites

Research conducted by E4 to tie in with brand new British 90’s-set series My Mad Fat Diary, based on the real-life teenage diaries of Rae Earl – starting Monday 14th January, 10pm

It’s a statistic Adrian Mole would be proud of: personal pen-and-paper diaries are more popular now than pre social-media days, as today’s teens take comfort in private journals as an outlet for their innermost thoughts and feelings, a survey by E4 has revealed.

The survey – undertaken to coincide with the launch of My Mad Fat Diary, a new 90s-set British series based on the real-life teenage diaries of Rae Earl – reveals that 83% of today’s teenage girls keep a diary, compared with 69% in the 1990s.

Source: Channel 4 press release, 14 January 2013

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